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Lisa Reilly, AVP, Advertising & Public Relations at Mass Mutual Retirement Services, discussed the iconic MassMutual brand, how the organizational culture has evolved in recent years, and some exciting new research endeavors within the Retirement Services division.

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Mark Fernandes, Chief Leadership Officer of Luck Companies, discussed the impact of value-based leadership on workforce culture and productivity.

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Bill Solomon, Vice President of Customer Care for Vonage, and Nav Chakravarti, Vice President of Product Management at Oracle, discussed knowledge management and how it can improve the customer experience while reducing costs.

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Kathy Kerr, Vice President-Customer Services, shares her insights on the two different worlds that CISOs and CIOs are living on right now and how they can meet in the middle to make better business decisions.

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CISOs are from Mars and CIOs are from Venus

Executive Spotlight
July 14, 2014

Barry Caplin, Chief Information Security Officer, shares his insights on the two different worlds that CISOs and CIOs are living on right now and how they can meet in the middle to make better business decisions.

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By Michael Malpass

The European Commission (EC) opened an investigation Tuesday into whether the Russian gas company, Gazprom, had blocked fair competition in natural gas markets in Central and Eastern Europe. Gazprom holds a monopoly on exporting gas from Russia, and supplies about a quarter of Europe’s gas imports.

In a statement, the EC said it was investigating three suspected anti-competitive practices. According to the commission, Gazprom may have not only prevented the free flow of gas across EU Member States and the diversification of gas supply, but may have also linked the price of gas to oil prices, creating unfair prices for its customers.

Such behavior, according to the EC, would be in violation of Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, which prohibits the abuse of a dominant position in order to affect trade between Member States. If found to be in violation, Gazprom could be fined as much as 10 percent of its global annual revenue.

The EC’s formal investigation of Gazprom comes after unannounced inspections of natural gas companies last September, including those affiliated with Gazprom. According to the EC, the companies inspected may have either been in engaged in anti-competitive practices – practices such as market partitioning, impeding network access and supply diversification, and excessive pricing – or had information about such practices.

According to the New York Times, Gazprom said during these inspections that its practices in foreign markets had always been in compliance with local regulations. A Gazprom representative could not be reached Tuesday evening for comment on the current investigation. According to the BBC, the company said: “Let them investigate.” 


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